Jim Vines’ Interview

june 2011 100 copy.JPGResearching Colonel Mosby for Something Gray in VA

I was recently interviewed by author and screenwriter Jim Vines for his blog, so thought it may be of some interest.

Here’s a bit on Jim from his bio:

“I’ve been a working screenwriter and script consultant since the early 1990s.  My non-fiction book Q & A: The Working Screenwriter (interviews w/ 16 working scribes) became quite popular upon its publication in 2006.  In April 2015 I published my debut novel, Luigi’s Chinese Delicatessen, which is a rollicking tale about a young man coming to Los Angeles to become–yes, you guessed it–a screenwriter.  I currently have two blogs: one for screenwriters and one for indie novelists.”

He wanted to interview indie novelists, and the life of a writer, so we mostly discussed Xposure.

Xposure_paperback.jpgThe complete front and back covers for Xposure

So without further ado, here’s the link for those of you without cable or a significant other:

http://jimvinespresents.blogspot.com/2017/03/indie-author-spotlight-phillip-thomas.html?m=1

Although primarily about my novel, my screenplay (Something Gray) was also pertinent in regard to promotion, etc.  Still hoping the right set if eyes read it on Amazon and it gets optioned.  A long-shot, but one Mosby would have taken with great audacity.

jsm funeral.jpgThe turnout for Mosby’s funeral 1916

The funeral gathering (above) for Mosby incorrectly lists his slave, Aaron Burton, in the picture, but he had died in 1902.  Mosby remained close to Aaron and sent him money for most of his life as a sort of pension.  Their friendship was complicated by a war over slavery (Mosby’s own admission, Lost Causers be damned), but it never waned.

Screenshot 2017-03-27 16.49.41.png

Mosby’s slave in 1898

In a letter to Ranger Sam Chapman in 1907, Mosby wrote,

“I am not ashamed of having fought on the side of slavery—a soldier fights for his country—right or wrong—he is not responsible for the political merits of the course he fights in” and that “The South was my country.”

And in 1898, in another letter, he wrote with equal honesty,

I’ve always understood that we went to war on account of the thing we quarreled with the North about.  I’ve never heard of any other cause than slavery.”

That may seem strange to view your state as your “country,” but not in 1860 America.  Today it might be equivalent to a soldier fighting for his country, but disagreeing over a policy like abortion…but he would fight for his country first, despite moral outrage on an administration’s position.

 

 

 

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